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High objects of State (letters patent from Queen Victoria, each w/ Great Seal):
Author of Balfour Declaration - 1898 diplomatic credentials, for talks with Germany
|
Chancellor of the Exchequer letters patent of Gladstone, 1873 

The (Swedish General) Viktor Balck Olympic Games- Founding Archive
Swedish gold and bronze medals honoring Viktor Balck | Viktor Balck 1912 Stockholm Olympics book Tower and Sword collar of Viktor Balck

Civil War Gillmore Medal to Jewish officer who helped 1863 "Glory" charge toward Ft. Wagner 1863                                                                        
Statesmen |Koerber - 1920s friend, then foe of Hitler |The Viktor von Koerber WWI Aviation Archive|
Presentation keys, gold medal to major U.K. statesman  Award Documents to important 19th century European diplomats

The JFK and staffers convention badges etc. ArchiveI.D. Badges to JFK and Secretary Ev Lincoln Mass. Labor Federation badge (major speech)  1960 Democratic Nomination campaign: aide Bob Troutman

Heroines | "Girl who defied Hitler" at 1936 Olympics: biography  Inge Sorensen Archive: items                 First ever (gold NYC) Women's Club Medal of Honor
  Award Diplomas to great Jewess opera singer
The Poignant Mayer family Jewish Heroism for (in WWI) and Flight from (pre-WWII) Germany Archive 
Presentation trowel etc. to president of "philanthropic" society for troubled girls

Concepts | News |
Historical commentary

Silver medal, 27 mm. diameter, given to members of Nobel Committee for medicine

Royal Swedish Academy

(whose members ratify choices of laureates by Nobel Committees)
1926 MEMBERSHIP MEDAL, 44 mm. diameter,
commemorating 30th anniversary of Nobel's death

"Hollow" bronze plaques, ea. 65 mm., of reverses of Nobel Prize medals for Literature, Medicine, and Science

from Royal Swedish Mint

Awards of Outstanding International Importance to Statesmen and Heroines

Objects related to the Nobel Prize

No others known to ever have been on the market.

Hollows obtained from Ulf Nordlinds Mynthandel AB, Stockhlom, November 2000.

Silver Nobel Prize Literature medal, same size as regular awarded medals (66 mm. diameter); "a few were struck c. 1902, in silver, silver gilt and bronze for museums and collectors", according to the book by the Royal Coin Cabinet, Nobel Medals (Lars O. Lagerqvist, 2001), p. 22.

Medal obtained from Ulf Nordlinds Mynthandel AB, Stockhlom.

No others known to ever have been on the market.

From Royal Coin Cabinet, Nobel Medals (Lars O. Lagerqvist, Stockholm, 2001), pp. 25-26
The Medalets of the Awarding Institutions

The various committees, each of them having five members, which have the delicate
assignment to find a worthy laureate for the Nobel Prize have been assigned a medalet
with the donor's portrait on the obverse an different reverses depending on the category
of the prize. They are not distributed according to the same rules for the academies and
for the Norwegian Storling. The rules have also been changed during the last century.
The medalets have occasionally been used as gifts, but only in silver.

The three committees of the Royal Academy of Sciences present their suggestions to their respective sections ("classes"), e.g. for physics, chemistry, and economic sciences (the two first-mentioned since 1901; the last-mentioned since 1969), and at the second meeting all the members receive one medalet in silver gilt. Then, when the final decisions are taken by the Academy in corpore, everyone present receives one medalet in silver gilt for each prize, i.e. three. Those employees of the secretariat that are present receive three medalets as well.

In the spring each year, the Karolinska Institute's Nobel Committee for physiology or medicine meets with the Nobel Assembly of that Institute, consisting of up to 50 professors, and on that occasion they and the committee members receive the medalet in silver. If further meetings are found necessary, they again receive the medalet in silver. At the final voting in October they are all handed the same medalet, but now in silver gilt.

Up to and including 1979 the medalets were struck in gold (23 carats), and since 1980 in silver or silver gilt. Those who have been present at the meetings for some years can exchange ten medalets in silver or silver gilt for one in gold (now 18 carats). Gold was abandoned in 1980, since the Swedish taxation authorities had pointed out that the value the 23 carat medalets represented was too high and that those who received it ought to be assessed for taxes!

The Swedish Academy used their old jetton of 1793 for their Nobel Prize meetings up to and including 1929, when they arranged for a medalet with Nobel's portrait to be struck, and it has been used ever since. It is only bestowed at the final meeting with the Academy in corpore. Since they only have 18 members (and it is seldom that all members are present), this medalet has been struck in a comparatively small number. It was struck, as the others, in gold (23 carats) up to and including 1979, and since 1980 in silver gilt.

1A

The medalet for the participants in the choice of the Nobel laureate(s) in physics.
(The Royal Academy of Sciences.)
Artist: Erik Lindberg, 1901; the reverse engraved by his father Adolf Lindberg at the Royal Mint, Stockholm.

Gold, 23 carats (up to and including 1979, c. 20 g) and 18 carats (17 g) since 1980, silver and silver gilt (13 g), 27 mm. This medalet is struck by the Swedish Mint, which keeps the dies....

Obverse: Portrait, inscriptions and signature as No.1, but reduced.
Reverse: The symbol of the Royal Academy of Sciences, a crowned globe with the three crowns [Sweden's coat of arms], surrounded by two wings, above the radiant Northern star. Below the inscription REG[ia] - ACAD[emia] - SClENT[iarum] -SVEC[iae] - (=The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences).

Edge:
Since 1914, marks of the Mint, the metal and the year.

2 A. The medalet for the participants in the choice of the Nobel
laureate(s) in chemistry.

(The Royal Academy of Sciences.) The same medalet is used as for the prize in physics (No.1 A). Gold, silver and silver gilt, diameter and weight as No. 1A.

Gold medals, 27 mm. diameter, given to members of Sweden's Royal Academy
of Sciences
, for having attended ten meetings where they voted on ratification of those
nominated to become Laureates by the Nobel Committees for Physics and Chemistry 

From Royal Coin Cabinet, Nobel Medals (Lars O. Lagerqvist, Stockholm, 2001)

Telephone  773-539-5751      
FAX            773-304-0131
Postal address
P.O. Box 300791, Chicago, IL 60630, USA
Electronic mail
General Information: buynobel@sbcglobal.net
Prices available upon request.

Silver Nobel Prize Medal struck by Royal Swedish Mint, c. 1902 

Gold relief image of Alfred Nobel, for impression onto front interior of Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine diploma,          on leather, 113 x 115 mm., obtained from Fälth & Hässler AB (near Stockholm) in June 2000.

None other known to have appeared on the market.

US WWII WASP service certificate to 1st winner of Amelia Earhart Scholarship

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Telephone  773-539-5751      
FAX            773-304-0131
Postal address
P.O. Box 300791, Chicago, IL 60630, USA
Electronic mail
General Information: buynobel@sbcglobal.net
Prices available upon request.

J.A. Schramek
& Associates

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Telephone  773-539-5751      
FAX            773-304-0131
Postal address
P.O. Box 300791, Chicago, IL 60630, USA
Electronic mail
General Information: buynobel@sbcglobal.net
Prices available upon request.

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